BAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGUREBAMANA FIGURE

BAMANA FEMALE FIGURE attributed to the artist Tinnin Fane

Ethnic group:

Bamana, Bambara

Country of origin:

Mali

Material:

wood

Years:

Early 1900's

Dimensions:

28 cm

Cultural Background:

On a customised stand
With slender narrow incised body, arms carved free, the hands on the lower hips, tall incised median crest rising above heart-shaped face with straight nose and small open mouth. The coiffure is falling with short plaits beside the ears, the breast projecting and the back is straight, each foot is on semi-circular base. Fine glossy dark and encrusted patina

Tinnin Fané lived in Mali, in the village of Fakola, near the border to Côte d'Ivoire, about 50 km west of Tengréla, where he worked as a blacksmith and carved masks and figures for the people in the region. Fané said that his ancestors first came from Niamala in the north later moving to the nearby village of Mpiessana before finally settling in Fakola where they worked as blacksmiths. It was here that they built furnaces to smelt iron from which they forged tools such as small hoes called Dabas and axes and gained some reputation as carvers of masks and figures.
In 1981, when Fané was already an old man, he carved a wooden figure for Karl-Heinz Krieg, who documented him sculpting it by photos and in a film. Mory Fané, one of Tinnin Fané’s younger brothers, explained the purpose of such figures as follows: “This figure is called Mayeni in Fakola and was used by a Tchein-làlà (a diviner among the local Bambara). Tchein-làlà means ‘he who studies the sand to resolve other people’s problems’.” (Mory Fané, 1996)

Provenance:
- Private Collection, London, UK
- Christies, London, UK


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